Painting of Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen of Heaven
The Virgin in Heaven Above a Gathering of Saints by Auguste Hess

 

O God, of Whose mercies there is no number, and of Whose goodness the treasure is infinite; we render thanks to Your most gracious majesty for the gifts You have bestowed upon us, evermore beseeching Your clemency, that as You grant the petitions of them that ask You, You will never forsake them, but will prepare for the reward to come. Through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

The Vatican has removed Our Lady of the Atonement Catholic Church from the Archdiocese of San Antonio and it now will operate under a special Catholic diocese based in Houston, church officials announced Tuesday. The move came after weeks of speculation and a months-long tug-of-war between the archdiocese, which wanted to hold on to the Northwest Side parish that worships in the Anglican tradition, and the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter, which oversees about 40 such Catholic parishes in the United States and Canada that follow Vatican-approved Anglican liturgy. The Archdiocese of San Antonio had fought the move and Archbishop Gustavo García-Siller had come under fire for his decision in January to initiate removal proceedings against the parish priest, Father Christopher Phillips, citing “pastoral concerns” and the parish’s separate identity from others in the archdiocese. Atonement had been the first Catholic congregation in the nation to be named a Pastoral Provision parish by the Vatican and thus allowed to worship in Anglican traditions. Phillips, married and the father of adult children, was ordained a Catholic priest by the late Archbishop Patrick Flores after having served as an Anglican priest. The ordinariate’s statement expressed “its deepest gratitude to the Archdiocese of San Antonio for welcoming and caring for Our Lady of the Atonement since its inception, and for the Archdiocese’s ongoing commitment to the Church’s care for the unity of Christians.”

Source: Vatican moves San Antonio parish to a special Houston-based diocese

March 21, 2017
HOUSTON — The first Pastoral Provision parish in the U.S. is coming into the Ordinariate.

Our Lady of the Atonement Catholic Church and its school, the Atonement Academy, have been transferred to the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter, effective March 21. At the direction of the Holy See, all parishes of the Pastoral Provision are to be incorporated into the Ordinariate: a special diocese for Roman Catholics who were nurtured in the Anglican tradition or whose faith has been renewed by the liturgy and evangelizing mission of the Ordinariate.

Founded in 1983 in San Antonio, Our Lady of the Atonement was a parish of a “Pastoral Provision” established by Pope John Paul II to allow for former Anglicans to form Catholic parishes within existing U.S. dioceses. With the establishment of the North American Ordinariate in 2012 and the ordination of its first bishop in 2016, the Holy See now expects all Pastoral Provision parishes in the U.S. to be integrated into the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter.

The Ordinariate expresses its deepest gratitude to the Archdiocese of San Antonio for welcoming and caring for Our Lady of the Atonement since its inception, and for the Archdiocese’s ongoing commitment to the Church’s care for the unity of Christians. Through continued collaboration in the coming months, the Archdiocese and the Ordinariate will remain dedicated to supporting the natural evolution of this Pastoral Provision parish into the Ordinariate.

Our Lady of the Atonement and its school join more than 40 Ordinariate parishes and parochial communities in North America. Ordinariate parishes celebrate Mass according to a special form of the Roman Rite, using Vatican-approved texts which for centuries nourished the faith in Anglican contexts and prompted members’ desire to join the Catholic Church.

In 2009, the apostolic constitution, Anglicanorum coetibus, authorized the creation of global “Ordinariates”: a type of diocese which could receive groups of former Anglicans directly into the Catholic Church. (There are three Ordinariates in the world: Our Lady of Walsingham in the United Kingdom; the Chair of Saint Peter in the United States and Canada; and Our Lady of the Southern Cross in Australia.)

Source: Becoming One

Painting, The Calumny of Appelles by Botticelli
Calumny of Appelles by Botticelli

I came across this article at The Real Presence and found it to be very instructive. Pray for those whose hearts are so bitter that they commit calumny and slander. Pray for their victims who have been irreparably harmed.

The immediate focus of the Eighth Commandment is falsehood that does injury to one’s neighbor. Harm to another person’s reputation, therefore, is the special prohibition of this divine mandate. A person’s reputation may be injured in various ways, notably by detraction and calumny or slander. Detraction is the unjust violation of the good reputation of another by revealing something true about him. Calumny or slander differs from detraction in that what is said or imputed about a person is not true.

A good reputation is the esteem that one person has formed and entertains about another. It may regard his moral qualities, such as honesty, chastity, or truthfulness; it may regard physical and mental qualities or attainments. In either case, reputation is the object of an acquired right, and consequently to take it away or lower it becomes an act of injustice. Not only the living but also the dead have a right to good esteem. During life we wish to remain in the grateful memory of mankind, and such an expectation can lead us to great exploits.

What needs to be stressed, however, is that a person’s good name is something he cherishes even though we may not think he deserves it. No matter; it is his good name, not ours. We may, if we wish, forfeit our good name provided no harm is done to others. But another person’s good reputation belongs to him, and we may not do it injury by revealing, without proportionately grave reason, what we know is true about him.
Continue reading “Commandments of God – Detraction and Calumny”

Although this prayer is wonderful to pray regularly when our pride rears its ugly head, it is an especially poignant prayer and meditation for the Lenten season. Our ultimate example in humility is our Savior Jesus Christ, who willingly suffered in silence on our behalf each one of the things listed in this litany.

THE LITANY OF HUMILITY

O Jesus! Meek and humble of heart, Hear me.

From the desire of being esteemed, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being loved, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being extolled, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being honored, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being praised, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being preferred to others, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being consulted, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the desire of being approved, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being humiliated, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being despised, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of suffering rebukes, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being calumniated, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being forgotten, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being ridiculed, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being wronged, Deliver me, Jesus.

From the fear of being suspected, Deliver me, Jesus.

That others may be loved more than I, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be esteemed more than I, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That, in the opinion of the world, others may increase and I may decrease, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be chosen and I set aside, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be praised and I unnoticed, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may be preferred to me in everything, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

That others may become holier than I, provided that I may become as holy as I should, Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it. Amen.

Source: Praying Through Lent: The Litany of Humility

Abuse of power

Dear Fellow Parishioners and Friends of Our Lady of the Atonement.

Our Hopedale office has advised me that they have received close to 600 signed mandates. This is 60% rate of return and more continue to arrive, although at a reduced pace. In other cases where mandates were used, the best we have done is about 25% of the affected group.

Over the past week there has been a spate of rumors concerning a possible decision about the future status of the parish. Even if such a decision has been made, I would urge you to avoid speculation about the details and await the official notification. Within the past few days, there have also been rumors about possible further adverse actions by the archdiocese. Again, I would caution about speculation until we see what actually happens.

I have received several questions and comments about the possibility of obtaining the repair of harm done to the parishioners or patrimony of the parish. In theory, this is possible; but it is not always prudent. Such a petition is called a denunciation and it should not be submitted without professional assistance. At this point, I cannot say if we should do this. Following are the texts of two canons that might apply and I would welcome your comments.

Can. 128 Whoever illegitimately inflicts damage upon someone by a juridic act or by any other act placed with malice or negligence is obliged to repair the damage inflicted.

Can. 1389 §1. A person who abuses an ecclesiastical power or function is to be punished according to the gravity of the act or omission, not excluding privation of office, unless a law or precept has already established the penalty for this abuse.
§2. A person who through culpable negligence illegitimately places or omits an act of ecclesiastical power, ministry, or function with harm to another is to be punished with a just penalty.

Our Lady of the Atonement, pray for us.

Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle.

.–Charles M. Wilson